Your Councillors


Community Housing and Environment Committee

19 January 2016

Is the final decision on the recommendations in this report to be made at this meeting?

No

 

Maidstone Housing Strategy 2016-2020

 

Final Decision-Maker

Council

Lead Director or Head of Service

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Lead Officer and Report Author

Tony Stewart, Senior Enabling Officer

Classification

Non-exempt

Wards affected

All wards

 

 

This report makes the following recommendations to this Committee:

1.    That the Committee note that a consultation process has been undertaken with relevant stakeholders. A summary of these consultations and responses are included within this report and at Appendix B. To also note Government changes to National Policy in the Housing and Planning Bill.

2.    That the Committee agrees that following extensive research, analysis and consultation, the Key Priority Themes and stated outcomes identified for the new Maidstone Housing Strategy 2016-2020 be approved.

3.    That the Committee gives delegated authority to the Head of Housing and Community Services to develop the Action Plan (attached at Appendix A) and final Maidstone Housing Strategy document, before it is presented to Policy and Resources Committee and full Council for adoption.

4.    That the Committee endorses the first phase of actions that the council can commence in order to address the current housing situation in the first year of the new Maidstone Housing Strategy.

 

 

This report relates to the following corporate priorities:

·         Keeping Maidstone Borough an attractive place for all

·         Securing a successful economy for Maidstone Borough

 

 

Meeting/Event

Date

Community, Housing and Environment Committee

13 October 2015

Consultation

14 October 2015 to 31December 2015

Community, Housing and Environment Committee

19 January 2016

Policy and Resources Committee

17 February 2016

Council

2 March 2016



Maidstone Housing Strategy 2016-2020

 

 

 

1.         PURPOSE OF REPORT AND EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

1.1      This report is updating the Committee following the consultation process which has been undertaken with relevant stakeholders through two workshops held in December 2015.  An online survey was also placed on the Councils website and a summary of these consultations and responses are included in this report. 

1.2      It is proposed that following extensive research, analysis and consultation, the Committee approves the Key Priority Themes and stated outcomes for each theme identified for the new Maidstone Housing Strategy 2016-2020.

1.3      A decision on the recommendations in this report also enables the Head of Housing and Community Services to continue to develop the Action Plan (attached at Appendix A) and final Maidstone Housing Strategy document before it is presented to Policy & Resources Committee and full Council for adoption.

1.4      In response to the pressure for affordable housing currently being experienced by the Council there are immediate actions identified as part of the Key Priority Themes that it is imperative for the Council to address in the first year of the new Maidstone Housing Strategy. This report highlights some of the work that is already underway to help achieve these ambitions.

 

 

2.         INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND

 

 

2.1      The Housing Strategy is an overarching plan that guides the council and its partners in tackling the major housing challenges facing the borough.  It sets out the priorities and outcomes that we wish to achieve and provide a clear strategic vision and leadership in an uncertain economic climate. The Strategy contributes to the council’s corporate priorities for Maidstone ‘to keep the Borough an attractive place for all and to secure a successful economy. As previously reported to the Committee, the Maidstone Housing Strategy is also intrinsically linked with other plans and strategies of the council, most notably the Local Plan.

2.2      It is proposed that the new strategy looks ahead for five years, covering 2016-2020.  The Chancellor’s Autumn Statement in 2014 included measures to extend capital investment to the current Affordable Homes Programme 2015-2018, for a further two years, up to 2019-20. The Council’s Strategic Plan also runs from 2015-2020; in order to remain consistent with the Council’s financial planning it is not considered appropriate to set a longer term than five years for the new Maidstone Housing Strategy.

2.3      The ambition behind this strategy is to ensure that all people in the Borough have access to good quality homes that are affordable for them and meet their needs.  Every council has a responsibility to understand what matters most to its local communities and to respond to this through investment, service planning and delivery.  The Council also has to take into account both national and regional aspirations and sometimes balance these against local priorities.

 

 

3.         CONSULTATION PROCESS AND FEEDBACK

 

3.1      The Maidstone Housing Strategy for 2016-2020 is supported by a number of key background evidence papers, documents and research and data analysis of which were undertaken to determine the key housing related challenges facing Maidstone.

3.2      The identified Key Priority Themes as well as suggested outcomes and actions were presented in a report to the Committee on 13 October 2015.  The Key Priority Themes identified for the new Maidstone Housing Strategy were approved for consultation with key stakeholders and partners, in order to develop the Action Plan and stated outcomes for each Key Priority Theme with the following amendments.

·         The addition of the following wording to the end of Priority : to develop sustainable communities; and

·         The removal of the 18,500 figure from the Priority 1 outcomes.

3.3      A stakeholder mapping exercise was carried out to identify key partners, voluntary organisations and internal departments that needed to be consulted in order to develop the Maidstone Housing Strategy Action Plan.

3.4      Consultation with key stakeholders has been undertaken through two workshops held in December 2015 and via an online survey accompanied by supporting documentation on the Councils website.

3.5      Invites were sent to key stakeholders to attend one of two workshops that were held in December 2015.  Attendees to the workshops included officers from Housing; Planning  and Commercial and Economic Development; Developers; Registered Providers; Architects, Consultants; Kent Invicta Chamber of Commerce; the National Homebuilders Federation; Letting/Estate Agents; Social Care Commissioning; Public Health and Family Support Officers of Kent County Council; Homes and Communities Agency and Action with Communities in Rural Kent.

3.6      A scene setting presentation was given at each workshop in order to give delegates a context and purpose for the new Maidstone Housing Strategy, including key challenges facing the Borough. Table discussions with delegates then took place on each of the Key Priority Themes. The discussions were used to identify what the potential barriers were preventing us from achieving the actions and outcomes, and collaborative ways of working together in order to overcome them.

3.7      Feedback from the workshop sessions was very positive in what many saw as a diverse Action Plan for the Borough.  There was general agreement over the Key Priority Themes that have been identified. Comments received have been organised according to the Key Priority Themes they address below.

Priority 1: Enable and support the delivery of quality homes across the housing market to develop sustainable communities

·         It was generally agreed that there is a need to deliver more housing (a mixture of private and social) and that any new housing should benefit the community.

·         Infrastructure (such as transport, local employment) was important to consider when regenerating areas and delivering new homes.

·         There was general support for the council setting up a vehicle, such as a Local Housing Company in what was viewed as a positive step to address local ambitions and objectives. Lack of council owned land could however make delivery harder.

·         Collaborative joint ventures and partnership work was encouraged with registered providers, developers, and the Homes & Communities Agency.

·         There was agreement that the council should look to maximise and obtain investment to support housing delivery within Maidstone, as there are a range of potential funding sources available.

·         Promoting self-build homes as an option (especially in smaller communities), as well as home ownership products, stimulated interest and was viewed as a positive approach.

·         It was stressed that the 1% reduction in affordable/social rents over the next four years, plus the lack of grant, will have a negative impact on the viability of schemes to provide affordable rented homes.

·         The requirement to have flexible policies and strategies was highlighted due to Government changes in national housing policy. 

·         There was recognition on an ageing population and the need to address older peoples housing needs.

·         Following the Government’s new space standards was encouraged as well as helping to enable the delivery of homes that can be adapted (wheelchair accessible/lifetime homes) to respond to peoples changing needs. Increase in cost though was raised as an issue.

·         Rising costs in construction materials was noted as well as a shortage of skills in the construction sector. However local apprenticeship schemes were in operation and offered on-site experience to give apprentices the right mix of technical and practical skills.

 

           
Priority 2: Ensure that existing housing in the Maidstone Borough is safe, desirable and promotes good health and well-being.

·         It was felt that the new Housing & Health team will be better able to signpost tenants and residents to relevant support services.

·         Demonstrating value for money on health interventions was considered important along with being certain on the health demographics of some areas within the Borough.

·         Promoting ways for residents to improve their health and well-being by tackling fuel poverty and advice on sustainable heating and energy efficiency in households was considered important.

·         Working with health authorities to focus on long term health issues ensuring an efficient use of health and social care resources.

·         Seeking good practice from the NHS Healthy New Town Initiative was raised where there will be a renewed focus on new affordable housing by offering support from the NHS to help “design in” health and modern care from the outset.

·         More outreach work with the private sector and promoting further landlord incentives to access the private rented sector was encouraged.

·         Unaffordable letting agency fees in the private rental sector was raised as an issue, and promoting housing associations to private landlords to be their managing agents could help with management and affordability issues.

·         Exploring the use of Community Hub (Advice Centres) within schemes that can offer services and facilities to the wider community, as well as to residents of the scheme.

·         There was widespread support for improving the condition and supply of accommodation within the private rental sector by engaging with landlords.

·         A number of support issues where raised including the need to be able to challenge landlords on behalf of tenants, and landlords being kept up-to-date on their responsibilities and how they can take action when necessary.

·         Partnership with housing associations and the voluntary sector can also be an opportunity to regenerate empty homes, and bring about some wider social benefits including opportunities for local employment, skills and training in the refurbishment of properties.

·         Raising awareness of what affects housing quality can have on health and well-being was mentioned. There was also widespread agreement for ensuring sign-posting for appropriate advice and support was in place for residents to address health inequalities.


Priority 3: Prevent homelessness, secure provision of appropriate accommodation for homeless households and supporting vulnerable people

 

·         There was support for increasing temporary accommodation supply with existing providers and for the council to directly acquire properties to house homeless and vulnerable households.

·         Lack of affordable accommodation available for single less than 35 year olds was acknowledged.

·         There was agreement that strengthening partnerships, investment and landlord incentives with the private sector would be a viable option to secure appropriate accommodation for homeless households.

·         Working with KCC to reduce the negative impact on children in temporary accommodation was highlighted.

·         The need to offer advice and support to affected households to manage welfare reform changes to the benefits system was acknowledged.

·        The importance of mapping local services and strong partnerships and communications across all sectors of relevance to homelessness (health, employment, vulnerable service users) was stressed.

·         The Government emphasis on shared ownership and starter homes may restrict access to future affordable rented accommodation. Other tenure options for homeless households may therefore need to be considered.

·         Prevention methods were considered as vitally important in helping to prevent and relieve homelessness.

 

3.8      An online survey was on the council’s consultations webpage for 6 weeks ending on 31 December 2015. The survey was also advertised on the Councils Facebook and Twitter pages and an email sent to all relevant stakeholders. A total of 106 responses were received. A summary of the responses to the main key questions asked are attached at Appendix B.

3.9      The majority of respondents agreed that the identified Key Priority Themes meets the challenges for Maidstone over the next 5 years. The majority of respondents also considered that the list of outcomes (what we plan to achieve to support the Key Priority Themes), were high priority for the council and its partners to address.

3.10   Many residents highlighted issues that relate more to the Local Plan rather than the Housing Strategy, when answering: Are there any important issues missing from the proposed Maidstone Housing Strategy 2016-2020 Action Plan? The common topic was the importance of associated infrastructure to support all the new housing (i.e. roads, transport, schools, hospitals, doctors' surgeries etc.).

3.11   The Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Charging Schedule will set out the standard charges that the council will levy on specified types of development, in order to fund the infrastructure needed to support growth. The timetable for preparing the Charging Schedule will closely follow the local plan programme, and the schedule will be supported by an Infrastructure Delivery Plan which will identify what, where, when and how the infrastructure is needed. Transport modelling is also taking place to consider future growth and congestion as well as potential measures to address this.

 

 

 

4.         KEY HOUSING PRIORITY THEMES / OBJECTIVES

4.1      Following the extensive research, analysis and consultation, it is recommended that the Committee approves that the new Maidstone Housing Strategy 2016-2020 is designed around the following key priorities and stated outcomes:

·      Priority 1: Enable and support the delivery of quality homes across the   housing market to develop sustainable communities.

Outcomes – What we plan to achieve.

a) Enable the delivery of homes as identified in the emerging Local Plan; and has an appropriate policy framework in place that delivers an appropriate mix, tenure and range of housing to meet identified need.

 

b) Deliver a mix of homes of different types, tenure and size, via direct provision and in partnership with private developers, housing associations and other key partners, which meet the needs of the local population.

 

c) Deliver new affordable homes that are designed to a high standard, energy efficient, accessible and respond to people’s changing needs.

 

d) Maximise housing investment opportunities by seeking innovative funding and delivery options to support housing delivery within Maidstone.



·      Priority 2: Ensure that existing housing in Maidstone Borough is safe, desirable and promotes good health and well-being.

Outcomes – What we plan to achieve.

a) To raise housing quality and standards across all tenures and improve the condition of existing homes to maximise health and wellbeing outcomes for all.

 

b) To improve health outcomes for residents by reducing health inequality to ensure a healthy standard of living for all.

 

c) Promote ways for residents to improve their health and wellbeing by tackling fuel poverty, energy efficiency advice and managing domestic bills.

 

·      Priority 3: Prevent homelessness; secure the provision of appropriate accommodation for homeless households and supporting vulnerable people.

Outcomes – What we plan to achieve.

a) Prevent and relieve homelessness amongst local residents who are at risk of homelessness by offering timely, expert advice that helps to prevent their homelessness.

 

b) Increase the availability of suitable accommodation for homeless households via direct provision and the use of the private rented sector, to reduce temporary accommodation costs, length of stay and reliance on bed and breakfast accommodation.

 

c) Support independent living and reduce risk of repeat homelessness for vulnerable residents by offering a range of housing options, advice and support to maintain or improve their health and well-being.

4.2      This new Housing Strategy for Maidstone gives the Council an excellent opportunity to make a real difference for the residents of the Borough. 
Appendix A lists the suggested actions to help us achieve the above key priority themes and outcomes.  This includes working with partners to facilitate housing development, maximising investment opportunities, raising housing quality standards, promoting ways for residents to improve their health and wellbeing and preventative measures and services for homeless persons.

 

 

           

5.         HOUSING AND PLANNING BILL

 

5.1      It is important to note Government changes to National Policy since the last report to Committee, and how this impacts on Maidstone’s Housing Strategy. On 13 October 2015, the Government published the Housing and Planning Bill, which sets out measures to boost house building and makes a number of changes to the planning system.

5.2      On publication of the Housing and Planning Bill the Government said it would kick-start a “national crusade to get 1 million homes built by 2020” and transform “generation rent into generation buy.” The supply-side measures in the Bill are primarily focused on speeding up the planning system with the aim of delivering more housing. There is also a clear focus on home ownership, with measures to facilitate the building of Starter Homes; Self/Custom Housebuilding; and the extension of the Right to Buy to housing association tenants following a voluntary agreement with the National Housing Federation (NHF).  A brief summary of these initiatives are set out below.

5.3      Starter Homes: The Bill puts into legislation the Government’s commitment to provide a number of Starter Homes for first-time buyers under the age of 40. Starter Homes would be sold at a discount of at least 20% of the market value. Specifically, the Bill puts a general duty on all planning authorities to promote the supply of Starter Homes, and provides a specific duty, which will be fleshed out in later regulations, to require a certain number or proportion of Starter Homes on site.

5.4      Concerns have been expressed about the impact on the number of affordable rented homes developed, whether the 20% discount would be deliverable, whether these homes would be genuinely affordable and how this policy supports other planning policies on housing provision.

5.5      In addition, the Homes and Communities Agency have recently announced that Affordable Rent will not be grant funded post March 2018. The Government’s approach to the delivery of affordable rented accommodation is now very different from previous grant funded programmes. The Government will now only be promoting Starter Homes and Shared Ownership products. The greatest demand for affordable housing identified by the Council’s Strategic Housing Market Assessment is for affordable rented accommodation.

5.6      Self Build and Custom Housebuilding: The Bill adds to and amends the Self-build and Custom Housebuilding Act 2015, which requires local authorities to keep a register of people seeking to acquire land to build or commission their own home. The Bill specifically requires local authorities to grant “sufficient suitable development permission” of serviced plots of land to meet the demand based on this register.

5.7      Rogue landlords and letting agents: The Bill will give local authorities additional powers to tackle rogue landlords in the private rented sector. They will gain the ability to apply for banning orders against private landlords. A database of rogue landlords and agents will assist authorities in England in carrying out their enforcement work. Landlords will benefit from a clear process to secure repossession of properties abandoned by tenants.

5.8      Voluntary Right to Buy: The Queens Speech 2015 confirmed the Governments’ intention to take forward the extension of the Right to Buy for Housing Association Tenants. The Bill will not, as originally expected, introduce a statutory Right to Buy (RTB) for housing association tenants. Following the Government’s acceptance of the National Housing Federation’s offer to implement the RTB on a voluntary basis, the Bill provides for grants to be paid to associations to compensate them for selling homes at a discount.

5.9      Reforms to the Planning System: The Bill contains a number of different reforms to the planning system, with the aim of speeding it up and allowing it to deliver more housing. Powers are given to the Secretary of State to intervene in the local and neighbourhood plan making process. A new duty to keep a register of brownfield land within a local authority’s area will tie in with a new system of allowing the Secretary of State to grant planning permission in principle for housing on sites identified in these registers.

5.10   This Bill represents a significant change in emphasis from Government. It is important that the Council sets in place a strategy and framework in order to respond to the Bill’s initiatives.  Actions in order to achieve our Key Priority Themes and stated outcomes will continue to be developed to ensure we have a robust Action Plan in place. The Maidstone Housing Strategy provides us with an opportunity to work positively in partnership with key agencies to achieve local priorities and as a vehicle to help promote and deliver many of the proposals put forward by government. 

_________________________________________________________________

6.         MAIDSTONE HOUSING STRATEGY ACTION PLAN

 

6.1      There are some first phase actions that support our Key Priority Themes of which the Council can start to address within the first year of the new Maidstone Housing Strategy. To enable these proposals to succeed work is already underway to help achieve local priorities, as well as to respond to Government initiatives announced in the aforementioned Housing and Planning Bill. A brief summary is provided below.

6.2      Promoting Starter Homes: - The council is keen to support and promote home ownership as part of wider plans to regenerate the town centre and promote town centre living as a key component of the 5 year development plan for the county town. Starter Homes are being promoted by the Government as an alternative to other housing tenures, such as shared ownership and social/affordable rent. If successful, the initiative will enable first time buyers to come back into the market and alleviate pressure on other parts of the market, such as the rented and affordable housing sectors.

6.3      A £26m fund has been made available in support of this initiative for housebuilders to demonstrate a range of high quality homes that will be available for first-time buyers. In a further move to support aspiring homeowners the government has also made available up to £10m for local authorities to prepare more brownfield land for development of starter homes.

6.4      Promoting starter homes ties in with the following action points on the Housing Strategy Action Plan.

·        Promote home ownership products e.g. Starter Homes, Help to Buy, Shared Ownership and Self-Build in Maidstone.

·        Monitor and respond to the changing social housing market

·        Explore opportunities for funding investment with a range of partners including the Local Enterprise Partnership, Homes & Communities Agency, institutional investors that will contribute towards the delivery of housing across the market.

6.5      The Council is already starting to engage with developers about the supply and building of Starter Homes within the Borough.  Officers are also actively involved in discussions with the Homes & Communities Agency (who administer the funds for Starter Homes) regarding securing investment for the supply of Starter Homes on brownfield town centre sites.

6.6      The Council however understands the potential impact the introduction of Starter Homes may have on the supply of traditional affordable housing. The requirement to deliver a particular number or proportion of Starter Homes to be granted planning permission and the ability of developers to use Starter Homes to meet their section 106 affordable housing obligations, risks having a significant impact on the delivery of traditional affordable rented housing.

6.7      The Housing Strategy will look to promote and support Starter Homes were appropriate, but in accordance with Local Plan Policy. Wherever possible they should be in addition to, not at the expense of much needed homes for affordable rent and shared ownership. As the Bill progresses, there are a number of issues the Council will continue to raise and gain clarity on such as how the general duty to promote Starter Homes interacts with local policy and requirements to get local plans in place.

6.8      Increasing Supply of Accommodation for Homeless Households: - The Council in the last two years has purchased two properties (Magnolia House and Aylesbury House) to assist with reducing the rising cost of providing temporary accommodation for homeless households.  But more still needs to be done and the Council is keen to build upon the success of these schemes. Officers are currently looking to purchase two more properties to increase the supply of accommodation for homeless households of which is the subject of a separate report to this Committee.

6.9      Property A – This 6 bedroom shared facilities property is looking to be purchased potentially for use as shared accommodation to discharge duty for single homeless persons under 35’s.  This client group have trouble accessing the private rented sector, especially those in receipt of housing benefit and therefore subject to the Shared Accommodation Rate, which limits how much housing benefit people under 35 can claim.

6.10   Property B – This property is looking to be purchased and developed into 6 self-contained flats.  It is proposed that this property would be suitable for use as self-contained, emergency accommodation for homeless families, in the same way that Aylesbury House is utilised.  It is in a town centre location within easy reach of local amenities, public services, transport links and the council’s Gateway.

6.11   In addition, the Council is in the process of negotiating access arrangements to properties in Maidstone, with existing temporary accommodation providers to help maximise availability of suitable accommodation for homeless households and reduce temporary accommodation costs.

6.12   Properties being targeted are those in or close to the town centre, with good access to public transport, schools, shops and local amenities. These include flats and houses across a range of property sizes.

6.13   Increasing the availability of suitable accommodation for homeless households ties in with the following action points in the Maidstone Housing Strategy Action Plan.

·        To build/acquire new affordable and private homes to meet the commercial and housing objectives of the council.

·        Enable the delivery of new affordable housing, particularly 1 and 2 bedroom homes to meet the identified need.

·        Consider on a site by site basis joint venture and partnership models to share expertise, income, resources and risk.

·        To expand on the success of Aylesbury House by investing in the acquisition/purchase of additional temporary accommodation within Maidstone to house homeless and vulnerable households.

·        Secure shared housing for under-35s single homeless people.

6.14   Building new affordable and private homes to meet commercial and housing objectives: - Evidence is that councils are most successful when working in partnership with others and where they actively use their own assets to promote housing development opportunities. This was highlighted in the Elphicke-House Report recently commissioned by Government, which reviewed local authorities’ role in housing supply. The key recommendation is that council’s change from being statutory providers to being Housing Delivery Enablers.

6.15   The Brunswick Street Car Park is viewed as an underperforming asset by the Council and its potential use is now under review for complete or partial redevelopment for housing with retained car parking provision. The main objectives for the proposed development of this site is to maximise revenue income for the Council, regenerate the surrounding area and delivering affordable housing. The Council is considering options for the redevelopment of the site. This could be achieved by entering into a joint venture partnership with an existing Registered Provider partner.

6.16   Building new affordable and private homes to meet commercial and housing objectives ties in with the following action points on the Housing Strategy Action Plan.

·        To build/acquire new affordable and private homes to meet the commercial and housing objectives of the Council.

·        Bring forward Brunswick Street car park to deliver a quality housing scheme to meet housing and commercial objectives

·        Enable the delivery of new affordable housing, particularly 1 and 2 bedroom homes to meet the identified need.

·        Explore opportunities for funding investment with a range of partners including the Local Enterprise Partnership, Homes & Communities Agency, institutional investors that will contribute towards the delivery of housing across the market.

·        Consider on a site by site basis joint venture and partnership models to share expertise, income, resources and risk.

 

7.         PREFERRED OPTION AND REASONS FOR RECOMMENDATIONS

 

7.1      The consultation process has now finished and the responses received were generally positive feedback as to the Council’s plans to address the emerging housing challenges facing Maidstone over the next five years. The Council will also take into account the recent Government changes in National Policy as published in the Housing and Planning Bill, and will ensure the Maidstone Housing Strategy Action Plan responds to these new initiatives.

7.2      A number of actions are already well underway to help support and deliver the stated outcomes for each of the identified Key Priority Themes. A brief summary of these are highlighted within the report.

7.3      The recommendations within this report will also enable the Head of Housing and Community Services to continue to develop the Action Plan and final Maidstone Housing Strategy report, before it is presented to Policy and Resources Committee and full Council for adoption.

 

 

8.       NEXT STEPS: COMMUNICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE
   DECISION


8.1    Now that the consultation period has finished, the final Maidstone Housing
          Strategy 2016-2020 needs to be written for submission firstly to the Policy &
          Resources committee on 24 February 2016 and then to full Council on 2 March.
          2016.

 

8.2    The timetable for the development of the new Maidstone Housing Strategy is set out in the table below.  

 

Timetable

Meeting/Event

Date

Community, Housing and Environment Committee

13 October 2015

Consultation

14 October 2015 to 31December 2015

Community, Housing and Environment Committee

19 January 2016

Policy and Resources Committee

17 February 2016

Council

2 March 2016

 

 

 

9.        CROSS-CUTTING ISSUES AND IMPLICATIONS

 

 

Issue

Implications

Sign-off

Impact on Corporate Priorities

The adoption of the housing strategy will assist in the delivery of the council’s corporate priorities.

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Risk Management

The delivery of this strategy will depend upon the effectiveness of the partnership working between the statutory and voluntary sector and through listening to and involving service users.  Housing is a cross-cutting issue and new partners need to come on board and recognize the importance of tackling the challenges identified.  The way forward will require an effective strategic partnership that focuses on delivery of successful outcomes across services, combined with robust risk analysis.

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Financial

To be developed as part of the housing investment plan.

Paul Riley, S151 Officer & Ellie Dunnett, Finance

Staffing

Appropriate staffing resources will need to be in place to deliver the outcomes and actions established for the strategy.

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Legal

N/A

Kate Jardine, Team Leader (Planning), Mid Kent Legal Services

Equality Impact Needs Assessment

The Housing Strategy potentially affects all population sections and groups.  A preliminary EQIA has been carried out, which will be reviewed following the stakeholder consultation exercise, before the new Housing Strategy is presented to full council for adoption.

Anna Collier, Policy & Information Manager

Environmental/Sustainable Development

Environmental and sustainability issues will need to be fully considered to support any housing related development proposals, such as Brunswick Street car park.

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Community Safety

N/A

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Human Rights Act

N/A

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services

Procurement

N/A

John Littlemore, Head of Housing and Community Services & Paul Riley Section 151 Officer

Asset Management

None

 

 

 

10.      REPORT APPENDICES

 

The following documents are to be published with this report and form part of the report:

·         Appendix A: Priorities, Outcomes and Actions

·         Appendix B: Online Survey Consultation Feedback